Navigation
Home Page

Egypt

What do we learn about when looking at Ancient Egypt?

For this area of topic we cover many areas of Egypt this includes

Housing - We investigate how the Ancient Egyptians lived and how they lived.

They lived in houses made from mud bricks. The annual floods brought a lot of mud which made the construction process easier. Brick makers molded mud into square shapes using wooden molds after which these were dried and hardened in the sun.

 

The River Nile - Where to flows to and from

The Nile River runs through Egypt. Most people live along and around the Nile River. Nile River, the longest river in the world, called the father of African rivers. ... which probably originated from the Semitic root naḥal, meaning a valley or a river valley and hence, by ... The river then flows west and northwest through Sudan to join the White Nile at Khartoum. ... Blue Nile Falls, on the Blue Nile River, Ethiopia.

 

Mummification - What happens when you are mummified?

The methods of embalming, or treating the dead body, that the ancient Egyptians used is called mummification. Using special processes, the Egyptians removed all moisture from the body, leaving only a dried form that would not easily decay.

 

Egyptian Gods - Who are they and why are they so important?

Egypt had one of the largest and most complex pantheons of gods of any civilization in the ancient world. Over the course of Egyptian history hundreds of gods and goddesses were worshipped. The characteristics of individual gods could be hard to pin down. Most had a principle association (for example, with the sun or the underworld) and form. But these could change over time as gods rose and fell in importance and evolved in ways that corresponded to developments in Egyptian society. 

 

Rulers of Egypt

As ancient Egyptian rulers, pharaohs were both the heads of state and the religious leaders of their people. The word “pharaoh” means “Great House,” a reference to the palace where the pharaoh resides. While early Egyptian rulers were called “kings,” over time, the name “pharaoh” stuck.

As the religious leader of the Egyptians, the pharaoh was considered the divine intermediary between the gods and Egyptians. Maintaining religious harmony and participating in ceremonies were part of the pharaoh’s role as head of the religion. As a statesman, the pharaoh made laws, waged war, collected taxes, and oversaw all the land in Egypt (which was owned by the pharaoh).

 

How did ancient Egyptians write to each other?

Hieroglyphs were written on papyrus reed, which is a water or marsh plant, with tall straight hollow stems. The reeds were flattened, dried, and stuck together to make pages. The Egyptians also carved hieroglyphs onto stone and painted them on the walls of the tombs.

Top